More numbers?  What’s going on here?

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Can Walter White play LBJ?  Can Hal Wilkerson?  It turns out he can, and very compellingly indeed.

Bryan Cranston has distinguished himself as one of our time’s finest actors imbuing the characters he portrays with striking intensity.  Making his Broadway debut as Lyndon Johnson in the play All The Way, Cranston makes us forget dangerous Walter and inept Hal.

The play spans the period between November 1963 and November 1964, starting shortly after the assassination of John F. Kennedy, when Johnson becomes President.  The next eleven months was a pivotal time in Johnson’s political career, as it was for America.

During Johnson’s first year in office he fought hard to win re-election, and at the same time, was also driven to enact The Civil Rights Act of 1964, his signature piece of legislation.

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The process was fraught, and Johnson not only had to earn the support of Martin Luther King Jr. but he needed to win over the Southern Democrats, which proved to be a powerful force.  As a Texan, he identified with the group, but in they end, the passing of The Civil Rights Act changed the politics of the South forever and laid fertile ground for the Republicans.

To accomplish his goals, Johnson proved himself a manipulative bully, intimidating friend and foe alike.  ”It’s not personal, it’s just politics” he was known to say in his best ‘good ol’ boy’ drawl.

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Still, he remained vulnerable, a trait shown in scenes with his wife, Lady Bird.

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"All the Way with LBJ" was a campaign slogan for the 1964 campaign, and tirelessly, that’s right where he went.

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Photos by Sara Krulwich

For an explanation of what’s going on here, go here.

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Walking the streets of New York I began to notice a wide variation in how addresses are marked.  It’s a simple way for a home owner or business to express a little style, and intrigued, I started collecting photographs…slowly.  For several years now, when a number caught my eye, it was mine.  It wasn’t until recently that I picked up the pace on the project in order to fill in the blanks (finally finding the elusive #18 and #76) and complete a series of addresses from One to One Hundred.

Like any project that drags on for a few years, there is always the risk that someone will beat you to the punch.  My friend Erik did, long ago.  

So without further delay here is the first set of ten.

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While seeking a shady patch of grass for a picnic in Governors Island’s Nolan Park, I was summoned up to the porch of one of the houses by a man who was cradling a pug in his arms.  I know a few people who love pugs so had a feeling that it would be OK.  ”Would you like to come in and see my display of antique gowns?” he asked.  Cautiously, I went inside…

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…and saw this.  

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The man, who turned out to be Michael Levinson of Empire Historic Arts, explained that this was an art installation created by he and his partner, Rodney DeJong.  

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Tattered and Torn: (On the Road to Deaccession) is a display of a few of the pair’s collection of 19th Century gowns that have historic significance, but are too worn or damaged to be kept by a museum, and have therefore been cast off.

The house is a former residence for US Coast Guard officers, and the rooms are in a suspended state of decay.  They are perfect for the imperfect, but still lovely gowns.

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"Go ahead, open the closet" Mr. Levinson urged.  A victim of my own imagination, I hesitated, so he patiently told me that a prized specimen was inside.  I opened the door, the light turned on and not only was the gown wonderful, I was delighted to see an expertly painted diorama.

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In all there were five wedding dresses from the mid 1800’s, as well as a few other fancy ball gowns.  And they were tiny!   Just like the pug, who despite wearing a very masculine studded leather collar, was named Sylvia.  And she was charming.

Over the last 30 years Tribeca has become a very desirable (and expensive) place to live.  But it’s not all pocket parks and multi-million dollar loft apartments.

This gritty alley endures, and is a reminder that some of the streets are still mean.  It was this building that I was photographing when I literally backed into Mmuseumm.

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Once the weekend comes, this Chelsea parking garage plays host to the most bizarre flea market I have ever seen.

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Art lines the entry ramp.

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The dreary space is comes to life with booths all staffed by characters*.

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A collection of your favorite thing is sure to be here.

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There are tools, both useful…

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…and dubious.

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Cameras, pocket watches and microscopes…

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and a “better” 4 way mousetrap.

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Are you are looking for a musical instrument with a certain “patina”?  It’s great to see the old round key typewriters and…

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…for the fashionable typist on the go, a RED portable.

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Perhaps you’d like a fur,

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or a furry animal.

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DON’T help yourself.

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I’d like to say “Who wants to play Jumpy Tinker?” at a party.

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Up-cycled school rulers.

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And interesting yet utterly useless things.

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*saved for another post

I’m not great at photographing people, so perhaps I’ll bring my friend, street photographer, Fabian Palencia some time.